How Safe is the Space Where Your Children go to Play?

While visiting a playground at a local park or school, we trust that the area is ultimately a safe space for our children to frolic and play. However, we likely do not always give the same attention to detail in creating safe play areas at our homes or near our farms. According to the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety, a safe play area is a carefully and thoroughly planned in a designated location with limited exposure to hazards such as traffic, agricultural production, and environmental concerns. The play area on a farm should be:

  • Within sight and sound of a responsible adult, to allow effective supervision.
  • Developmentally appropriate for the child’s age.
  • Away from environmental, structural, and machine-related hazards. This can include loud noise, poor air quality, lack of shade.
  • Designated by boundaries or physical barriers such as a fence.
  • Supplied with protective ground surfacing to minimize fall related injuries.
  • Full of play opportunities with activities allow children to experience physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development.
  • Well-maintained with grass mowed, snow removed, and examined on a regular basis.

Among the leading causes of serious play-related injuries include falls from play equipment onto unprotected ground surfacing, strangulation by clothing that becomes entangled on vertical protrusions and projections, head entrapment from entry into an opening, and injuries resulting from equipment tip-over. For additional information and resources on “Creating Safe Play Areas on Farms,” visit www.cultivatesafety.org/play

Every three days in the United States, a child dies due to an agriculture-related incident and every day, 33 children are injured due to an agriculture-related incident. According to 2014 data, more than 23.8 million youth visited farms across the United States. During these visits while fostering a child’s passion for agriculture and curiosity for farm practices, large equipment, and animals, it is vital to keep safety at the forefront. Farms are busy workplaces, and while children who live on the farm may know this, visitors to the farm might not. We need to continuously educate that the farm is not a play area and should treat the farm with the same respect and care as any other workplace.

We always need to send correct messages. Avoid confusing children by replacing sand boxes with corn. A young child will have trouble understanding and identifying the difference between grain in a corn box and grain in a gravity flow wagon. In addition to sending the wrong message, other hazards around include chocking, allergies, crowding, and as a food source can attract animals and pests, which can cause illness due to germs from feces. Also, although creative, farm-themed playsets that encourage climbing and playing on equipment resembling the likeness of tractors, silos, and harvesters, can send unsafe messages to children.  

Children deserve a safe place to play where they can create lasting, fond memories. Playgrounds and play areas do not become safer on their own. It takes caring from community members and people like you!  If you notice something does not seem safe, speak up or act. To ensure the spaces our children love to play are as safe as can be, the National Program for Playground Safety has designated April 26-30, 2021 as National Playground Safety Week.

This safety message was brought to you by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Days, recognized as the largest rural safety and health education program for children in North America. For additional safety information or details about hosting, volunteering, or attending a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021 and text the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321.

Photos: Large equipment and livestock, coupled with a child’s curiosity, can lead to a tragic incident. Therefore, it is important to create a play area for children that is both fun and safe with a physical barrier separating it from the busy, active workplace of the farm (photos courtesy of the National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety of Marshfield Clinic Research Institute).  

By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

The Progressive Agriculture Foundation Welcomes Logan Hall as New Marketing Communications Manager

The Progressive Agriculture Foundation is pleased to announce the hiring of Logan Hall, as its first Marketing Communications Manager. In this role, Hall will manage the foundation’s brand and communications across multiple platforms. He will work cross-functionally with both the program and partnership engagement teams to ensure that the foundation is effectively targeting prospective Progressive Agriculture Safety Day coordinators, volunteers, supporters, and financial partners.

“We are excited to welcome Logan as a member of our team,” said Brian Kuhl, president and chief executive officer for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation. “Logan’s extensive experience in public relations paired with his work around youth development and volunteerism through the Extension system, will help to strengthen the foundation’s marketing and communications efforts.

“This new role is essential in allowing us to better share our story and the impact we are making with children living in rural communities.”

The foundation governs Progressive Agriculture Safety Days, recognized as the largest rural safety and health education program for children in North America. Additionally, the work of the foundation has continued to expand and adapt with the latest identified needs, including reaching youth, volunteers, and partners through virtual formats.

“I am truly looking forward to working with the entire Progressive Agriculture Foundation team,” said Hall. It is an extraordinary opportunity to help share the incredible stories of the foundation’s work, its volunteers, and it partners as the foundation’s mission and impact are uniquely positioned at the intersection of education, advocacy, and advancement.

Previously, Hall served as the Extension Educator for Penn State Extension’s 4-H Youth Development program based in their Chester County office. Prior to his tenure with the Pennsylvania State University’s College of Agricultural Science Extension program, he served as Deputy Communications Director, as well as Acting Communications Director, at the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture – serving under two Administrations.

Hall also freelances developing print and electronic media to aid in strategic marketing with his clients. He will be based out of his home office in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania.

Hall joins the team of Progressive Agriculture Foundation staff to provide education, training and resources to make farm, ranch and rural life safer and healthier for children and their communities. For more information on Progressive Agriculture Safety Days or to learn how to get involved, visit http://www.progressiveag.org

Wear Your Helmet: Protect your Melon from a Brain Injury

In a hazardous workplace and playing sports, to enjoying a ride on horse, a bicycle, or an ATV (all-terrain vehicle), wearing a helmet can potentially save your life in the event of an incident and can be your best defense in preventing a brain injury. One major fall, crash, or flip could lead to a hospital trip. To bring a greater awareness to this issue, Brain Injury Awareness Month is being celebrated throughout the month of March.

Did you know brain injuries are the leading cause of disability and death in children and adolescents? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the two age groups at the greatest risk for brain injury are those between the ages of 0-4 and 15-19. Among those ages 0 to 19, each year an average of 62,000 children sustain brain injuries requiring hospitalization as a result of motor vehicle crashes, falls, sports injuries, physical abuse, and other causes. A staggering 564,000 children are seen in hospital emergency departments for brain injury and released. For children ages 0 to 14, brain injuries result in an estimated 2,685 deaths, 37,000 hospitalizations, and 435,000 emergency department visits. According to the Brain Injury Association of America, brain injuries can account for the following impairments:

  • Physical: speech, vision, hearing, motor coordination, headaches, paresis or paralysis, spasticity of muscles, seizure disorders, balance, and fatigue.
  • Cognitive: short term memory deficits, impaired concentration, slowness of thinking, limited attention span, impairments of perception, communication skills, planning, writing, reading, and judgement.
  • Emotional: mood swings, denial, self-centeredness, anxiety, depression, lowered self-esteem, restlessness, lack of motivation, and difficulty controlling emotions.

Brain injuries can be detrimental to children as their young brain is still developing. Although some may believe a younger brain can recover sooner and a child can bounce back easier than an adult, research has proved that is not the case. Children are impacted more devastatingly than an injury of the same severity on a mature adult.

Progressive Agriculture Safety Days lends a proactive approach to educating about preventing brain injuries by getting youth participants to understand the importance of a properly fitted helmet for various sport and recreational activities. Participants learn that when it comes to helmets, proper selection, fit, care, and use for the task at hand are all important considerations. Through fun, engaging, age-appropriate hands-on activities and demonstrations using items like eggs, cantaloupe, watermelon, and even a gelatin brain mold to truly understand the fragile nature of the human brain. We weave this important message in curriculum focused on animal safety, ATV/UTV safety, and bicycle safety.

Just as helmets differ, so are brain injuries and no two are the same. Brain injuries are complex, vary greatly from person to person, and the effects depend on the injuries cause, location, and severity. The Brain Injury Association of America’s “Change Your Mind” campaign also seeks to raise awareness on de-stigmatizing brain injury through outreach within the brain injury community, empowering those who have survived brain injury and their caregivers, and promoting the many types of support that are available to people living with brain injury. To learn more about this neurological disease, visit www.biausa.org.

This safety message was brought to you by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Days, recognized as the largest rural safety and health education program for children in North America. For additional safety information or details about hosting, volunteering, or attending a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021 and text the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321.

Photos: During an activity called, “Stop! Don’t Use Your Head,” Progressive Agriculture Safety Day participants learn first-hand about the fragile nature of the brain. We reinforce the cantaloupe portrays your head and what can happen if it hits the hard ground or pavement unprotected in the event of a fall from a bicycle, horse, or an ATV/UTV. The cantaloupe is dropped once in a helmet and another time without a helmet.

Written By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

From Amps to Zap! Preventing Electrical-related Burn Injuries on the Farm, Ranch, and at Home

Each year, in both the United States and Canada, approximately 450,000 people seek medical attention for burn injuries. In 2014 alone, burn injuries claimed 3,275 lives. What is even more sobering is the fact that many of these burn-related injuries were preventable. To shed light on this important issue, the American Burn Association observes Burn Awareness Week during the first full week in February.

Sadly, on September 21, 2013, the Allsup family of Earlham, Iowa, found their lives forever changed when they learned first-hand the seriousness of burn injuries. Their 10-year-old son, Christopher, fell victim to fatal burns obtained from an old gas can explosion. Christopher suffered burns on more than 90% of his body. The incident occurred in the early morning hours, while his dad was still sleeping, and his mother was on her way to work. Both Christopher, and his older brother Chad (who was 13 at the time), decided to start a fire outside. What was most devastating is the fact that this incident could have been prevented. Following Christopher’s death, the Allsup family established The Legacy of Christopher Allsup Gas Can Exchange in 2014, along with The Legacy of Christopher Allsup Foundation in 2017.  The family has vowed to educate and raise awareness regarding the dangers of portable gasoline containers that do not conform to ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) consumer safety standards.

This year’s theme “Electrical Safety from Amps to Zap!”, highlights burn injuries related to electrical dangers associated with unprotected electrical outlets, improperly used extension cords, lightning, and other workplace electrical injuries. For the past several years, electric safety has been one of the most popular topics offered at Progressive Agriculture Safety Days throughout North America, reaching nearly 50,000 youth participants in 2019 alone. From large high voltage to smaller tabletop demonstrations, participants learn to always look up for overhead powerlines, as well as down below for potential dangers, obey the signs, and identify what to do if power lines fall on a tractor, truck, or car.

Since nearly 73% of burns occur in the home, talking to your children about prevention is key. Here are a few ways you can prevent burn-related injuries:

  1. Use lighters and matches in a safe manner and keep them out of reach when not in use.
  2. Do not leave children unattended around open flames including campfires, candles, and barbeque grills. Have a “kid-free zone” of 3 feet or 1 meter near open flamed and areas where hot food or drinks are prepared to prevent scalding. Using the backburners of a stove when cooking, also add an extra layer of safety.
  3. Use covers to protect and keep fingers and other items out of outlets. Also, don’t overload outlets or power strips with too many cords.
  4. Keep electrical cords away from water sources, most often found in the kitchen or bathroom. This includes phone chargers, curling irons, and hairdryers.
  5. Keep accelerants, such as gasoline and propane, outside of the home and locked up.

This safety message was brought to you by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Days program, on a mission to provide education, training and resources to make farm, ranch and rural life safer and healthier for children and their communities.For additional safety information or details about hosting, volunteering, or attending a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day®, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021 and text the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321.

Photo: His family could have never imagined this would be the last school photo ever taken of 10-year-old, Christopher Allsup. Sadly, burn injuries sustained on September 21, 2013 from an unsafe gasoline can ended his young life. The Progressive Agriculture Safety Day program is on a mission to provide the education, training, and resources to prevent incidents like this from occurring to children living on farming or rural communities.  

Written By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

It’s colorless, odorless, and it can kill you! A closer look at the dangers of both Carbon Monoxide and Radon

Known as the “invisible killer,” carbon monoxide, also know as CO, is produced by burning fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, portable generators, or furnaces. When the gas builds up in enclosed spaces, people or animals who breathe it can be poisoned. In the U.S., more than 400 people die, 20,000 visit emergency rooms, and 4,000 are hospitalized annually due to carbon monoxide poisoning according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As temperatures drop and home heating is on the rise, carbon monoxide poisoning can be a hidden hazard lurking in the place you feel the safest – YOUR HOME! Winter months are a prime time for carbon monoxide poisoning as people turn on their heating systems and mistakenly warm their cars in garages. The most common symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are often described as “flu-like” and can include headache, dizziness, blurred vision, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, difficulty breathing, chest pain, loss of consciousness, confusion and can lead to death if it goes undetected or untreated.

Your best defense against poisoning is a carbon monoxide detector. Detectors save lives and should be placed on the wall about 5 feet above the floor or up to the ceiling on each floor of your home, especially where you sleep. Avoid placing them right next to or over a fireplace or flame-producing appliance. Test your detectors regularly and replace the battery at least once a year. Other important practices to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning include:

  1. Have your furnace, water heater, and any other gas or coal-burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year. If you have a chimney, check and clean it every year, and make sure your fireplace damper is open before lighting a fire and well after the fire is extinguished.
  2. Do not use portable flameless chemical heaters indoors.
  3. Never use a gas oven for heating your home.
  4. Never use a generator inside your home, basement or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door or vent; fatal levels of carbon monoxide can be produced in just minutes, even if doors and windows are open.
  5. Never run a car in a garage that is attached to a house, even with the garage door open; always open the door to a detached garage to let in fresh air when you run a car inside.

Like carbon monoxide, radon is also odorless, colorless, and poisonous. Therefore, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) designates the month of January as National Radon Action Month.  Radon exposure can cause coughing, chest pains, recurring respiratory infections, hoarseness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, lung cancer and is responsible for 21,000 deaths each year. One major difference among carbon monoxide and radon is in detection. Radon gas can only be detected by a one-time use radon test kit. These kits are easy to use and are available at your local hardware store, radon mitigation company, or online lab.

This safety message was brought to you by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Days program, working to keep children in rural communities safe from potential hazards around the farm, ranch, or at home. For additional safety information or details about hosting, volunteering, or attending a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day®, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021 by texting the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321 from your smartphone.

Photo: From smoke alarms to carbon monoxide detectors, Progressive Agriculture Safety Day participants learn how these life-saving devices can keep them and their families safe.

Written By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

Seeking a Marketing Communications Manager to join our Team

Seeking a Marketing Communications Manager to join our Team

UPDATE — This position has been filled!

We’re Hiring!

The Progressive Agriculture Foundation is looking to add a new member to our team and seeking a Marketing Communications Manager.

For more information on the position or how to apply, go to https://www.progressiveag.org/uploads/pressrelease/Marketing%20Communications%20Manager%202020%20.pdf

Send resume and letter of interest to careers@progressiveag.org


How Can We Gift with Safety this Holiday Season?

By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

As we reflect during this season of thanksgiving, we can all agree the greatest, most precious gift of all is that of life. Therefore, we need to ensure we value and treat that life the same way we do that shiny new toy or object. Proper care is important with any special gift, in the same way we need to also value our safety and health, as it is essential in maintaining our battery life. Sadly, this does not always get the full attention it deserves; however, during gift giving we can help bring this to the forefront.

Frugal Fred is a hard worker, who continuously puts the needs of others before his own and is still using a 30-year-old ladder, that even a squirrel would deem unsafe to climb on. Fred works hard to make his equipment last and may have had all intentions to replace the ladder; however, lack of time, financials, or another factor prevented this from happening. With the holidays approaching, possibly the best gift Fred could receive this year is a new ladder, as this would help make his daily activities not only easier, but ultimately safer. Fred can be anyone, a father, grandfather, uncle, or even a friend, that could be faced with an unsafe or unhealthy situation daily and not eager to seek help, but appreciative of the gesture.

After asking for a few years, you might be ready to honor Action Adam’s request for an ATV (all-terrain vehicle) or UTV (utility terrain vehicle). Adam has been proving he is responsible, and this equipment will help him with his various chores around the ranch. However, before you hand over the keys, enroll Adam in a safety training program. Therefore, he is starting out with a safety focus and learning what do from the start. Also, don’t forget to add other important Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) like a properly fitted helmet, over the ankle boots, eye protection, and even protective clothing.

That brings us to Brave Betty! Little Betty has been working so hard to master riding her bicycle without training wheels. Now all she is wanting is a brand-new bicycle as a gift. Before we upgrade to a big-girl bike, her helmet may need an upgrade as well. Also, don’t forget adding reflectors for riding in the evening or a water bottle to stay hydrated on hot, summer days. 

When giving a gift to a family this holiday season, consider practicality. Reusable face and hand sanitizer masks to help combat the spread of the Coronavirus makes great stocking stuffers. Items like smoke alarms and fire extinguishers may be scarce in a family’s home or farm. Families neglect to purchase these items on their own due to expense or failing to realize the item’s importance. For new parents, there are great gifts out there to help baby-proof the home. Little ones in our life are always anxiously awaiting their chance to open up the freshly wrapped package.

Whether big or small, toys are always a favorite among many children; however, placing extra thought into toy safety should always be a priority during purchase. Here are some important safety tips:

  1. Always read the directions that come with a toy together as a family, so everyone is on the same page and knows the necessary precautions. Even age-appropriate toys, such as sewing, baking or science kits, often require adult supervision.
  2. Teach older children to role model safe toy behavior by always keeping tiny toys out of reach for younger children. Use extreme caution with toys containing magnets, button batteries, balloons, or toys with small parts. 
  3. Be aware of your surroundings when playing with toys that fly. Assure you do not injure an unsuspecting person or destroy another’s property while at play.

In closing, don’t forget to give the gift of your time. Stay connected and be present by providing a listening ear this holiday season, as it may be the greatest gift you can give someone. 

This safety message was brought to you by the Progressive Agriculture Safety Days. This program teaches children in rural communities about potential hazards around the farm, ranch, or at home to help them adopt new, safe practices. For more information on safety or for details about hosting, donating or volunteering at a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day®, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Tuesday, December 1st kicks off the season of giving. Continue to give the gift of safety with a donation to help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021. Donate in honor of or in memory of a love one. Text the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321 or visit progressiveag.org/Donate.

Photo: Before these kiddos hit the trail and go, they always wear the appropriate safety gear from head to toe. Progressive Agriculture Safety Day is proud to partner with Polaris, the global leader in power-sports, to spotlight off-road vehicle safety. In 2020, a youth-sized Polaris Ranger UTV, along with all the appropriate PPE, was donated to help the program provide hands-on educate children and families on ATV/UTV Safety.

Do you hold the keys for driving safely at night?

By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

As we watched summer fade into fall, we observed the extra daylight in the evenings leave with the warmer weather. With Daylight Saving Time recently ending on Sunday, November 1st, we quickly took notice of how much darker it became earlier in the day. Therefore, as we finish the last of setting all our clocks backwards by one hour in most areas of the country, it is good to remind ourselves to sharpen our safety skills, especially when driving or walking at night.

Although it may become darker earlier, there will still be children and adults out riding their bicycles and walking home from work or various activities. As pedestrians, it is important to take safety into your own hands. This can be accomplished by always paying careful attention to your surroundings and avoiding unnecessary distractions, like your phone. Also, always be visible by wearing light colors, reflective clothing, and reflectors on bicycles or backpacks.

While only one quarter of our driving is done at night, 50% of traffic deaths happen at night. It does not matter whether the road is familiar or not, driving at night is always more dangerous. Shorter days, fatigue, compromised night vision, rush hour, and even impairment are some of the risks we face when driving at night. Depth perception, color recognition, and peripheral vision can be compromised in the dark, and the glare of headlights from an oncoming vehicle can temporarily blind a driver. Even with high-beam headlights on, visibility is limited to about 500 feet (250 feet for normal headlights). This creates less time to react to something on the road, especially when driving at higher speeds. You can hold the keys to safe driving by following these 10 tips:

  1. Make sure your headlights are clean and adjust them correctly. Your headlights should be aimed at the road, if they do not seem to be working effectively, do not let it go and have them looked at or repaired.
  2. Dim your dashboard.
  3. Look away from oncoming lights.
  4. If you wear glasses, make sure they are anti-reflective.
  5. Clean the windshield to eliminate streaks.
  6. Avoid being an impatient driver. Slow down to compensate for limited visibility and reduced stopping time.
  7. Avoid distractions like looking at your phone, eating, drinking, adjusting the radio or controls, or responding to passengers.
  8. Ensure you are getting plenty of sleep, preferably 7 to 9 hours is best.
  9. Do not drive if you have been awake for 16 hours or more. Essentially this is getting behind the wheel impaired.
  10. Make time for your annual vision exams. Night vision is the ability to see well in low-light conditions. As we age, we have greater difficulty seeing at night. Your eye exam can alert you of any compromises to your vision.  

For more information or to locate a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® program near you, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. If you do not see an event near you, contact us to see how we can help bring one to your local community. You can help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day in 2021 with a small donation. Text the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321 or visit progressiveag.org/Donate.

Photo: During this fun, interactive experience, Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® participants learn what distracted driving can look like. Therefore, they learn how they can be good passengers when in the car, so they can help the drivers safely reach their next destination.

Let’s “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen,” during Fire Prevention Week

By: Jana L. Davidson, Education Content Specialist for the Progressive Agriculture Foundation

With stay-at-home orders surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, a positive outcome was seeing families spend more time together in the kitchen. From baking tasty treats to cooking family dinners, many families enjoyed valuable time together preparing a meal.

Unfortunately, cooking is the number one cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Therefore, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) is recognizing October 4-10, 2020 as National Fire Prevention Week. This year’s campaign is focusing on cooking safety and preventing kitchen fires at home.  Here are 4 important tips to keep in mind when cooking to “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen.”

1. Stay focused on the food – Whether frying, boiling, or grilling food, always stay in the kitchen and give that job your full attention. If you must leave the kitchen, even for short time, turn the burner off.

2. Put a lid on it – Always keep a lid nearby when cooking. If a small grease fire starts, place the lid over the pan and turn off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it is cool. This simple step can prevent a grease fire from getting out of control.

3. Keep cooking area clear – Clean up the clutter. Giving cooking appliance space can lessen the chance of a fire occurring. Items like oven mitts, utensils, food wrappers, and towels, should be kept away from the stovetop.

4. Prevent scalds & burns – Both hot liquids and steam from the stove can cause devastating injuries. Taking precautions like turning the pot handles away from the stove’s edge and keep hot foods and liquids away from table and counter edges.

Fire safety remains one of the top lessons taught at Progressive Agriculture Safety Days throughout North America. In 2019 alone, more than 48,000 participants were reached through age-appropriate, hands-on education around fire safety. Depending on the participant’s age, Safety Days teach children a variety of important safety tips including:

  • Creating a fire escape plan and the importance of adopting the plan as a family.
  •  Practicing the stop, drop and roll technique to extinguish flames on their body.
  • Understanding the need for smoke alarms and where they should be placed in and around the home.
  • Learning where to properly store and how to use a fire extinguisher.  

For more fire prevention tips, messages, and resources for both children and parents, visit firepreventionweek.org.  

For more information or to locate a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day® in your local community, visit www.progressiveag.org or call us toll-free at 888-257-3529. Looking to make a safe investment and help send another child to a Progressive Agriculture Safety Day? Donate TODAY by texting the word “SAFETYDAY” to 44321 or visit progressiveag.org/Donate.

Photo: During this Progressive Agriculture Safety Day held in Iowa, participants understand the proper technique of using a fire extinguisher by using a digital simulator. 

Schedule for 2020 National Farm Safety and Health Week

Progressive Agriculture Safety Days is gearing up to celebrate National Farm Safety and Health Week, September 20-26, 2020, with several exciting events and hoping you will join in the fun! Click on the link to register via Zoom and look for our Facebook Events for more information. All are FREE events and open to children, parents, grandparents, teachers, etc. We will be giving away copies of the books featured, as well as Progressive Agriculture Safety Day t-shirts, water bottles, and other items.

September 21 at 7:00 p.m. CDT: Story Hour featuring Jacob and the Tractor. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3lP0esP and learn more in our Facebook Event https://www.facebook.com/events/2675218192738141/

September 22 at 7:00 p.m. CDT: Story Hour featuring When I Feel Sad. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/31UZdHL and learn more in our Facebook Event https://www.facebook.com/events/977880386008511/

September 23 (9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CDT): Virtual Progressive Agriculture Safety Day. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3hWztQO and learn more in our Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/4125496130811400/

September 23 (12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. CDT): Virtual Progressive Agriculture Safety Day. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3gOPSpi and learn more in our Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/666779754197059/

September 24 at 7:00 p.m. CDT: Story Hour featuring Josh the Baby Otter. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3gUGqRo and learn more in our Facebook event https://www.facebook.com/events/635390597359418/

September 25 at 7:00 p.m. CDT: Story Hour featuring Unbeatable Betty. Register via Zoom at https://bit.ly/3lL5k9B and learn more in our Facebook event link https://www.facebook.com/events/888790428312549/

Please help us get the word out on these great virtual opportunities for children and families!